ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Winter Is Tough on Feet
Extra Pounds in Mid-Life Affect Later Mobility
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
CANCER
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
CAREGIVING
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
For Fitness, Cutting Calories May Not Be Enough
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
Short-Term Air Pollution Exposure May Damage DNA
Chemical in Plastics May Cause Fertility Problems
EYE CARE, VISION
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
FITNESS
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Sun, Smoke, Extra Weight Add Years to Skin
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
Small Cuts in Salt Intake Spur Big Drops in Heart Trouble
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Add your Article

Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- National guidelines urge all Americans to engage in "moderate physical activity" at least 2.5 hours a week, but what does that mean if you're out for a stroll?

A new study provides the answer: It's equivalent to a brisk walk, or about 1,000 steps every 10 minutes.

"Now we know what moderate is," said the study's lead author, Simon J. Marshall, an assistant professor of exercise and nutritional sciences at San Diego State University. He suggests that people use pedometers to figure out if they're exercising at a high enough intensity.

The U.S. formerly recommended that people get 30 minutes of moderate exercise at least five days a week. But last fall, Marshall said, officials changed the guidelines to simply say that people should exercise 150 minutes a week.

"They dropped the per-day recommendation because there wasn't a compelling argument that people who exercised four days a week were any worse off than those who exercised five days a week," Marshall said.

For walkers, however, it was not quite clear what "moderate" activity meant, although some exercise specialists suggest that people walk 10,000 steps a day.

"Most people are familiar with the recommendation to get 30 minutes of exercise most days," said Dr. David Katz, director of the Prevention Research Center at Yale University School of Medicine. "Fewer people know that needs to be moderate intensity, and fewer still know what that means."

In the new study, researchers enlisted 58 women and 39 men, with an average age of 32, to walk on treadmills while a machine measured their energy expenditure. The idea was to determine what level of activity was in the moderate range.

The findings of the study, which was funded by the federal government, appear in the May issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

The researchers found that moderate exercise amounted to 92 to 102 steps a minute for men and 91 to 115 steps a minute for women.

"It's a bit like a brisk walk," Marshall said. "If you can imagine you're late for a bus, you're in a hurry. It's not a leisurely stroll, it's a brisk walk."

People may find it easiest to use a pedometer to measure their walking speed because it can be difficult to count steps and walk at the same time, Marshall said. "When you get above 50, you're trying to focus on what you're doing and where you're going."

There's one caveat though: The study found that about half of the pedometers on the market aren't accurate. Marshall said he would still recommend that people use them, however. Japanese-made models appear to be the most reliable when it comes to accuracy, he said.

The researchers said that three 1,000-step walks in a day, five days a week, would meet national exercise guidelines.

"Even walking below that threshold will usually have some benefit to your overall cardiovascular balance sheet," Marshall said. "But for reducing your risk of cardiovascular disease and other complications, the 30 minutes of moderate exercise seems to be important."

Katz said he suspects that some people will discover that they "need to take it up a notch."

"On the other hand, our advice has long been that 'moderate' is a pace that noticeably increases heart and breathing rate while still leaving you capable of speaking in full sentences," he said. "That is still about right. No pedometer required."

-Randy Dotinga

More information

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has more about walking to fitness.



SOURCES: Simon J. Marshall, Ph.D., assistant professor, exercise and nutritional sciences, San Diego State University; and David Katz, M.D., M.P.H., director, Prevention Research Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn.; May 2009, American Journal of Preventive Medicine

Last Updated: March 17, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com