ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Holistic Dentistry-My View
DIABETES
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Vitamin B12 Key to Aging Brain
Marinades Help Keep Grilled Meat Safe
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Warmer-Than-Average Temperatures Raise Migraine Risk
Pesticides Linked to Parkinson's
EYE CARE, VISION
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
Exercise 30 Minutes a Day? Who Knew!
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Maximize Your Run
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Small Cuts in Salt Intake Spur Big Drops in Heart Trouble
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
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Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding

MONDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- People with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding admitted to hospitals on weekends are more likely to die than those admitted on weekdays, according to two studies that analyzed U.S. patient data.

The first study found that people with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (NVUGIH) admitted on weekends were 36 percent less likely to have endoscopy within one day of admission and 22 percent more likely to die while hospitalized. There was one additional death for every 143 patients admitted on a weekend.

The researchers also found that people with acute variceal hemorrhage (AVH) admitted to non-teaching hospitals had lower rates of early endoscopy, but not higher death rates, than those admitted to teaching hospitals.

"Although previous studies have demonstrated differences in outcomes between weekend and weekday admissions, there has been limited analysis focusing on patients with GI bleeding, a common medical emergency that carries significant disease and death," the study's lead author, Dr. Ashwin N. Ananthakrishnan, of the Medical College of Wisconsin, said in an American Gastroenterological Association news release.

"The most important finding of our study is the higher mortality among NVUGIH patients admitted on weekends," he said. "This finding underscores the need for research into identifying the reasons for the weekend effect and to institute appropriate interventions."

The second study found that people with peptic ulcer-related upper gastrointestinal bleeding admitted to hospitals on the weekend had a higher death rate (3.4 percent vs. 3.0 percent), higher rates of surgical intervention (3.4 percent vs. 3.1 percent), longer hospital stays and higher hospital costs than those admitted on weekdays.

People admitted on weekends had to wait longer for an endoscopy (2.21 days vs. 2.06 days) and were less likely to undergo endoscopy on the day of admission (30 percent vs. 34 percent).

Both studies were published in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more about GI bleeding.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Gastroenterological Association, news release, March 1, 2009

Last Updated: March 02, 2009

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