ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Fractures in Older Adults Up Death Risk
Winter Is Tough on Feet
Healthy adults have potential autoimmune disease-causing cells
CANCER
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Smog Tougher on the Obese
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Probiotics Are The Good Guys
Is Coffee Good or Bad for Your Health?
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications
Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
EYE CARE, VISION
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
FITNESS
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Exercise 30 Minutes a Day? Who Knew!
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Keep Fire Safety in Mind as You Celebrate
Toxins May Form When Skin, Indoor Ozone Meet
What you need to know about swine flu.
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Omega-3, Some Omega-6 Fatty Acids Boost Cardiovascular Health
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Frequent Feedings May Be Making Babies Fat
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
SENIORS
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
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Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding

MONDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- People with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding admitted to hospitals on weekends are more likely to die than those admitted on weekdays, according to two studies that analyzed U.S. patient data.

The first study found that people with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (NVUGIH) admitted on weekends were 36 percent less likely to have endoscopy within one day of admission and 22 percent more likely to die while hospitalized. There was one additional death for every 143 patients admitted on a weekend.

The researchers also found that people with acute variceal hemorrhage (AVH) admitted to non-teaching hospitals had lower rates of early endoscopy, but not higher death rates, than those admitted to teaching hospitals.

"Although previous studies have demonstrated differences in outcomes between weekend and weekday admissions, there has been limited analysis focusing on patients with GI bleeding, a common medical emergency that carries significant disease and death," the study's lead author, Dr. Ashwin N. Ananthakrishnan, of the Medical College of Wisconsin, said in an American Gastroenterological Association news release.

"The most important finding of our study is the higher mortality among NVUGIH patients admitted on weekends," he said. "This finding underscores the need for research into identifying the reasons for the weekend effect and to institute appropriate interventions."

The second study found that people with peptic ulcer-related upper gastrointestinal bleeding admitted to hospitals on the weekend had a higher death rate (3.4 percent vs. 3.0 percent), higher rates of surgical intervention (3.4 percent vs. 3.1 percent), longer hospital stays and higher hospital costs than those admitted on weekdays.

People admitted on weekends had to wait longer for an endoscopy (2.21 days vs. 2.06 days) and were less likely to undergo endoscopy on the day of admission (30 percent vs. 34 percent).

Both studies were published in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more about GI bleeding.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Gastroenterological Association, news release, March 1, 2009

Last Updated: March 02, 2009

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