ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Barefoot Lifestyle Has Its Dangers
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
Scientists ID New Genes Tied to Crohn's Disease
CANCER
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Yoga Eases Sleep Problems Among Cancer Survivors
Family History Key Player in Brain Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
Omega-3 Fatty Acid May Help 'Preemie' Girls' Brains
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
DIABETES
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Clear Skies Have Become Less So Over Time, Data Show
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
Ozone-Depleting Inhalers Being Phased Out
EYE CARE, VISION
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Weak Muscles May Cause 'Runner's Knee'
Walking Golf Course Affects Swing, Performance
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Add your Article

Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk

MONDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Sun exposure, smoking and the source of water used for drinking may each play a role in whether someone develops and dies from bladder cancer, according to a new study.

Researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham found that well water consumption was linked to a higher incidence of bladder cancer in women and death from the disease in men and women alike. They speculated that this might be from pesticides leeching into unmonitored wells.

However, the amount of ultraviolet (UV) radiation a person is exposed to from the sun was found to be inversely linked to the chance of developing or dying from bladder cancer.

The study also confirmed previous research that smoking cigarettes is directly tied to developing and dying from bladder cancer.

About 69,000 cases of bladder cancer were diagnosed in the United States last year, with the disease claiming about 14,000 lives, according to the American Cancer Society. Men are about three times more likely than women to develop bladder cancer, and incidence of the disease varies widely among states.

The study was to be presented this week in Chicago at the annual scientific meeting of the American Urological Association.

"Cigarette smoking is a well-known risk factor associated with bladder cancer, but sources such as the patient's water supply are coming to light as potential unmonitored risk factors," Dr. J. Brantley Thrasher, an association spokesman, said in a news release from the group.

More information

The American Cancer Society has more about bladder cancer.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: American Urological Association, news release, April 26, 2009

Last Updated: April 27, 2009

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