ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
Indigo Ointment Benefits Psoriasis Patients
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Chronic Low Back Pain Is on the Rise
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
'Snowbirds' Beware the Climate Changes
CANCER
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
CAREGIVING
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Functional Foods Uncovered
More Educated Choose Healthier Foods, But Pay More
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Ozone-Depleting Inhalers Being Phased Out
EPA Alerts Seniors to Carbon Monoxide Dangers
Disinfectants Can Boost Bacteria's Resistance to Treatment
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
FITNESS
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
Sun, Smoke, Extra Weight Add Years to Skin
Eat Light - Live Longer
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Small Cuts in Salt Intake Spur Big Drops in Heart Trouble
Psychiatric Drugs Might Raise Cardiac Death Risk
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
St. John's Wort Doesn't Work for ADHD
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Countdown to Hair Loss
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Using the Mind to Heal the Heart
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
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What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring

THURSDAY, Feb. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The things mothers did as children may affect their children's memory and the severity of learning disorders, according to U.S. researchers who studied the brain function of pre-adolescent mice with a genetically engineered memory deficit.

This memory deficit was reversed when the mice were given two weeks of exposure to an enriched environment that included stimulatory objects, enhanced social interaction and voluntary exercise. These mice later gave birth to offspring with the same genetic mutation. But the offspring showed no signs of memory problems even though they were never placed in an enriched environment.

The findings were published in the Feb. 4 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

"What is so unique about this study is that we provided an enriched environment during pre-adolescence, months before the mice became pregnant, yet the beneficial effect reached into the next generation. The offspring had improved memory even without an enriched environment," study co-investigator Dean Hartley, a neuroscience researcher at Rush University Medical Center, said in a university news release.

"We were able to demonstrate that environmental enrichment during youth has dramatic additional powers. It can enhance the memory in future offspring of enriched juvenile mice," Hartley said.

Previous research found that placing young, normal and memory-deficient mice in an enriched environment for a fairly short period of time unlocks an otherwise dormant biochemical and control mechanism that boosts a cellular process in nerve cells called long-term potentiation (LTP), which is believed to be involved in learning and memory.

"This is the first study to demonstrate an inheritance of a change in a signaling pathway that promotes LTP and enhancement of memory formation, and that defects caused by a genetic mutation can be reversed by what the mother is exposed to during her youth," Hartley said.

More information

The Nemours Foundation has more about children and memory.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Rush University Medical Center, news release, Feb. 3, 2009

Last Updated: Feb. 05, 2009

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