ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
Vitamin D Plus Calcium Guards Against Fractures
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
CANCER
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
DIET, NUTRITION
Compound in Berries May Lessen Sun Damage
Soluble Fiber, But Not Bran, Soothes Irritable Bowel
Low-Fat Diet Does Little to Alter Cholesterol Levels
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pilots May Face Greater Cancer Risk
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Is It Safe to Go in the Gulf Coast's Water?
EYE CARE, VISION
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
Run for Your Life
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
Vitamin D and Bone Health: Are You Getting Enough of This Important Vitamin?
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Protect Your Kids From Swine Flu While at Camp
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
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What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring

THURSDAY, Feb. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The things mothers did as children may affect their children's memory and the severity of learning disorders, according to U.S. researchers who studied the brain function of pre-adolescent mice with a genetically engineered memory deficit.

This memory deficit was reversed when the mice were given two weeks of exposure to an enriched environment that included stimulatory objects, enhanced social interaction and voluntary exercise. These mice later gave birth to offspring with the same genetic mutation. But the offspring showed no signs of memory problems even though they were never placed in an enriched environment.

The findings were published in the Feb. 4 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

"What is so unique about this study is that we provided an enriched environment during pre-adolescence, months before the mice became pregnant, yet the beneficial effect reached into the next generation. The offspring had improved memory even without an enriched environment," study co-investigator Dean Hartley, a neuroscience researcher at Rush University Medical Center, said in a university news release.

"We were able to demonstrate that environmental enrichment during youth has dramatic additional powers. It can enhance the memory in future offspring of enriched juvenile mice," Hartley said.

Previous research found that placing young, normal and memory-deficient mice in an enriched environment for a fairly short period of time unlocks an otherwise dormant biochemical and control mechanism that boosts a cellular process in nerve cells called long-term potentiation (LTP), which is believed to be involved in learning and memory.

"This is the first study to demonstrate an inheritance of a change in a signaling pathway that promotes LTP and enhancement of memory formation, and that defects caused by a genetic mutation can be reversed by what the mother is exposed to during her youth," Hartley said.

More information

The Nemours Foundation has more about children and memory.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Rush University Medical Center, news release, Feb. 3, 2009

Last Updated: Feb. 05, 2009

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