ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Gene Plays Key Role in Clubfoot
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
CANCER
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
Selenium, Omega-3s May Stave Off Colorectal Cancer
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
CAREGIVING
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
DIABETES
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
'Soda Tax' Wins Health Experts' Support
Eating in America Still Unhealthy
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Rainy Areas in U.S. Show Higher Autism Rates
Improved Fungicides May Be Easier on Environment
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
EYE CARE, VISION
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Hidden Salt in Diet Haunts Many With Heart Failure
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
The Unmedicated Mind
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
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What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins

SATURDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Your legs may be hidden by snow pants this time of year, but women who have spider or varicose veins know all to well that warmer weather -- and more revealing clothing -- is just around the corner.

"Due to some predisposed conditions, varicose and spider veins may be inevitable for some people," Dr. Robert Weiss, president of the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, said in a news release from the organization. "However, there are many preventative measures and medical techniques available to diminish the appearance and pain associated with these vein conditions."

Weiss offered the following tips:

* Listen to your body. Though often more of a cosmetic concern, varicose and spider veins can cause such complications as fatigue, night cramps, leg swelling or itching around certain veins. Contact a dermatologic surgeon if you have any of these symptoms.
* Stay active. Walking, cycling, swimming and other activities keep blood circulating in the legs, helping to reduce pressure and blood pooling. Long periods of standing or sitting places pressure on the veins. Changing positions or frequently flexing calf muscles can help with circulation.
* Keep a healthy weight. This will aid in the prevention of varicose and spider veins by eliminating the excess pressure on your legs that cause veins to surface.
* Wear compression stockings. Support hose keep pressure evenly distributed. But, be careful: Tight clothing around specific body parts, including the waist and groin, might restrict circulation and actually lead to spider and varicose veins.
* Be cool. Excessive heat associated with baths and hot tubs can increase vein swelling, causing blood to pool.

If you want to seek treatment, visit a dermatologic surgeon to learn what options are best for you. Weiss said to be especially wary of advertisements offering "unique," "permanent" or "painless" solutions.

More information

The American Society for Dermatologic Surgery has more about varicose veins.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, news release, January 2009

Last Updated: Jan. 24, 2009

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