ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Many Americans Fall Short on Their Vitamin D
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
CANCER
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
DIABETES
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Successful Weight Loss Shows Unique Brain Patterns
Even in 'Last Supper,' Portion Sizes Have Grown
Keep Stress Off the Holiday Meal Menu, Expert Advises
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Heavy Traffic Can Be Heartbreaking
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
Clear Skies Have Become Less So Over Time, Data Show
EYE CARE, VISION
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
FITNESS
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
FDA Bans Unapproved Prescription Cough, Cold and Allergy Meds
Treat symptoms (result of disease) or diagnose systems (cause of disease)?
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Cherry-Enriched Diet Cut Heart Risks in Rats
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Add your Article

What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins

SATURDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Your legs may be hidden by snow pants this time of year, but women who have spider or varicose veins know all to well that warmer weather -- and more revealing clothing -- is just around the corner.

"Due to some predisposed conditions, varicose and spider veins may be inevitable for some people," Dr. Robert Weiss, president of the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, said in a news release from the organization. "However, there are many preventative measures and medical techniques available to diminish the appearance and pain associated with these vein conditions."

Weiss offered the following tips:

* Listen to your body. Though often more of a cosmetic concern, varicose and spider veins can cause such complications as fatigue, night cramps, leg swelling or itching around certain veins. Contact a dermatologic surgeon if you have any of these symptoms.
* Stay active. Walking, cycling, swimming and other activities keep blood circulating in the legs, helping to reduce pressure and blood pooling. Long periods of standing or sitting places pressure on the veins. Changing positions or frequently flexing calf muscles can help with circulation.
* Keep a healthy weight. This will aid in the prevention of varicose and spider veins by eliminating the excess pressure on your legs that cause veins to surface.
* Wear compression stockings. Support hose keep pressure evenly distributed. But, be careful: Tight clothing around specific body parts, including the waist and groin, might restrict circulation and actually lead to spider and varicose veins.
* Be cool. Excessive heat associated with baths and hot tubs can increase vein swelling, causing blood to pool.

If you want to seek treatment, visit a dermatologic surgeon to learn what options are best for you. Weiss said to be especially wary of advertisements offering "unique," "permanent" or "painless" solutions.

More information

The American Society for Dermatologic Surgery has more about varicose veins.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, news release, January 2009

Last Updated: Jan. 24, 2009

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