ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
Varicose, Spider Veins May Be Inevitable for Some
Too Few Screened for Abdominal Aneurysm, Study Says
CANCER
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
DIABETES
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
Leafy Greens Top Risky Food List
Coffee or Tea Consumption May Lower Stroke Risk
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Golf Course Insecticides Pose Little Danger to Players
Sunken, Unexploded Bombs Pose Cancer Risk
Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference
EYE CARE, VISION
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
FITNESS
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
More Single Women Are Having Babies
Toxins May Form When Skin, Indoor Ozone Meet
New Methods Could Speed Production of Flu Vaccines
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Add your Article

When Clocks Change, Body May Need Time to Adjust

(HealthDay News) -- That extra hour of sleep you'll get in most parts of the country on Sunday might be restful, but the end of Daylight Saving Time could spell trouble for your body clock, a sleep expert says.

Dr. Atul Malhotra, medical director of the sleep disorders research program in the division of sleep medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, explained in a hospital news release that there are ways to prevent the time change from disrupting your sleep habits.

For most people, the time shift in the spring is more problematic because an hour is "lost" rather than "gained," but for those who are disrupted by any change in schedule, Malhotra offered these coping tips:

* Stay away from caffeine and other stimulants, especially during the days before and after the time shift, and avoid napping for a few days because it can disrupt your sleeping at night.
* Sleep through that extra hour if you can instead of trying to get things done.
* Don't drive if you feel sleepy because of the time shift. Consider taking public transportation for a few days to give your body time to adjust.
* Relax, avoid stress and remember to take your regular medications over the weekend of the time change.

For those who have trouble sleeping overall, Malhotra suggested the following:

* Go to bed and wake up at the same times, even on weekends. No sleeping in.
* Avoid food and drinks with caffeine after lunch, including coffee, tea, soda and chocolate.
* Take 15 to 30 minutes to wind down before heading off to bed.
* Keep your room dark, quiet and cool; ear plugs and eye masks can help.
* Keep in mind that time in front of screens -- the computer or television varieties -- before bedtime can disrupt sleep.
* Don't work or study right before bedtime, in order to allow yourself to relax.
* Don't exercise strenuously right before bedtime.

SOURCES: Brigham and Women's Hospital, news release, Oct. 26, 2009 Published on: October 30, 2009