ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Needling Away Your Headaches With Acupuncture
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
A Winning Strategy to Beat Spring Sporting Injuries
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
CANCER
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Vitamin D May Lower Colon Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Low Vitamin A, C Intake Tied to Asthma Risk
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gene Mutation May Cause Some Cases of Seasonal Affective Disorder
Exhaust From Railroad Diesel Linked to Lung Ailments
Pilots May Face Greater Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Magnetic Pulses to Brain Improve Lazy Eye in Adults
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
FITNESS
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Swine Flu Fatality Rate a 'Little Bit' Higher Than That of Seasonal Flu
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
SENIORS
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
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When Clocks Change, Body May Need Time to Adjust

(HealthDay News) -- That extra hour of sleep you'll get in most parts of the country on Sunday might be restful, but the end of Daylight Saving Time could spell trouble for your body clock, a sleep expert says.

Dr. Atul Malhotra, medical director of the sleep disorders research program in the division of sleep medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, explained in a hospital news release that there are ways to prevent the time change from disrupting your sleep habits.

For most people, the time shift in the spring is more problematic because an hour is "lost" rather than "gained," but for those who are disrupted by any change in schedule, Malhotra offered these coping tips:

* Stay away from caffeine and other stimulants, especially during the days before and after the time shift, and avoid napping for a few days because it can disrupt your sleeping at night.
* Sleep through that extra hour if you can instead of trying to get things done.
* Don't drive if you feel sleepy because of the time shift. Consider taking public transportation for a few days to give your body time to adjust.
* Relax, avoid stress and remember to take your regular medications over the weekend of the time change.

For those who have trouble sleeping overall, Malhotra suggested the following:

* Go to bed and wake up at the same times, even on weekends. No sleeping in.
* Avoid food and drinks with caffeine after lunch, including coffee, tea, soda and chocolate.
* Take 15 to 30 minutes to wind down before heading off to bed.
* Keep your room dark, quiet and cool; ear plugs and eye masks can help.
* Keep in mind that time in front of screens -- the computer or television varieties -- before bedtime can disrupt sleep.
* Don't work or study right before bedtime, in order to allow yourself to relax.
* Don't exercise strenuously right before bedtime.

SOURCES: Brigham and Women's Hospital, news release, Oct. 26, 2009 Published on: October 30, 2009