ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
Ginkgo No Shield Against Alzheimer's
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age
Returning to the Road Tricky After Injury
Get in Step With Summer Foot Care
CANCER
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
Simpler Sleep Apnea Treatment Seems Effective, Affordable
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DIET, NUTRITION
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Antioxidant-Rich Foods Lose Nutritional Luster Over Time
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pilots May Face Greater Cancer Risk
Hairspray Exposure Ups Risk for Birth Defect in Sons
Household Chemicals May Affect Cholesterol Levels
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
FITNESS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Football Can Shrink Players
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
FDA Bans Unapproved Prescription Cough, Cold and Allergy Meds
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Swine Flu May Have Infected More Than 100,000 Americans
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Add your Article

When Clocks Change, Body May Need Time to Adjust

(HealthDay News) -- That extra hour of sleep you'll get in most parts of the country on Sunday might be restful, but the end of Daylight Saving Time could spell trouble for your body clock, a sleep expert says.

Dr. Atul Malhotra, medical director of the sleep disorders research program in the division of sleep medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, explained in a hospital news release that there are ways to prevent the time change from disrupting your sleep habits.

For most people, the time shift in the spring is more problematic because an hour is "lost" rather than "gained," but for those who are disrupted by any change in schedule, Malhotra offered these coping tips:

* Stay away from caffeine and other stimulants, especially during the days before and after the time shift, and avoid napping for a few days because it can disrupt your sleeping at night.
* Sleep through that extra hour if you can instead of trying to get things done.
* Don't drive if you feel sleepy because of the time shift. Consider taking public transportation for a few days to give your body time to adjust.
* Relax, avoid stress and remember to take your regular medications over the weekend of the time change.

For those who have trouble sleeping overall, Malhotra suggested the following:

* Go to bed and wake up at the same times, even on weekends. No sleeping in.
* Avoid food and drinks with caffeine after lunch, including coffee, tea, soda and chocolate.
* Take 15 to 30 minutes to wind down before heading off to bed.
* Keep your room dark, quiet and cool; ear plugs and eye masks can help.
* Keep in mind that time in front of screens -- the computer or television varieties -- before bedtime can disrupt sleep.
* Don't work or study right before bedtime, in order to allow yourself to relax.
* Don't exercise strenuously right before bedtime.

SOURCES: Brigham and Women's Hospital, news release, Oct. 26, 2009 Published on: October 30, 2009