ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Vitamin K Doesn't Slow Bone Loss
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
CANCER
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
Omega-3 Fatty Acid May Help 'Preemie' Girls' Brains
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
The High-Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) Debate
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Keep Stress Off the Holiday Meal Menu, Expert Advises
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Hurricane Threats: Time to Batten Down the Hatches
As Earth Warms, Lyme Disease Could Flourish
Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment
EYE CARE, VISION
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
FITNESS
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Biomarkers May Help Measure Rate of Decline in Dementia
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
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When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It

By Randy Dotinga
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Want to look younger or less tired? Focus on the area around your eyes, a new study suggests, because that's where people get visual clues about your age and level of fatigue.

When asked to estimate the age of people in photographs, participants in a study looked at the eye region almost half the time, researchers found. The number was about the same when the participants tried to figure out how tired people in the photographs were.

The findings might seem obvious, but the study's lead author, a plastic surgeon, said they're important because cosmetic-surgery patients don't always get treatment where they need it.

"They want to look younger and less tired, but if you look to see what's being offered them, it's often not things around the eyes," said Dr. Peter A. D. Rubin, a plastic surgeon in Brookline, Mass., and an associate professor of ophthalmology at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

Rubin and his colleagues launched the study to figure out how people gauge age and fatigue. "What better way than to see where are people actually looking when they're making these judgments about things?" he said.

The researchers recruited 47 college students -- 15 men, 32 women -- from the Boston area and told them to look at photographs of 48 older people on a computer monitor. The monitor analyzed reflections from the eye to determine where the study participants were looking. The participants then rated either the age or the fatigue level of the people in the photos.

When gauging the age of people, the students looked at the eye region 46 percent of the time, followed by the nose (19 percent), forehead (13 percent) and the area between the eyebrows (11 percent).

The numbers were similar when the students were trying to figure out how tired the people in the photos appeared.

The study findings were published in the February issue of the journal Ophthalmology.

The eye region makes up just 21 percent of the face, according to the study authors. So why does it seem to reveal so much?

"There is a lot going on around the eyes," Rubin said. For one thing, eyelids are the thinnest skin on the body, making swelling more prominent. Also, he said, the eye region undergoes many changes during aging and suffers from significant sun damage.

"Beauty is not only in the eye of the beholder," Rubin said. "It's also in the eye of the beholdee."

Timothy J. Slattery, a postdoctoral fellow in psychology at the University of California, San Diego, said the study findings reflect those of other research that has found that people fixate on the eyes when they look at photos of faces.

But the study does not prove that the eye region is the most important when it comes to judgments about age and fatigue, said Slattery, who tracks how the eye moves.

More information

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons has more about plastic surgery.



SOURCES: Peter A. D. Rubin, M.D., plastic surgeon, Brookline, Mass., and associate professor of ophthalmology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tenn.; Timothy J. Slattery, Ph.D., postdoctoral fellow in psychology, University of California, San Diego; February 2009, Ophthalmology

Last Updated: Feb. 02, 2009

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