ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Scientists ID New Genes Tied to Crohn's Disease
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Selenium, Omega-3s May Stave Off Colorectal Cancer
Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
CAREGIVING
Reduce Suffering, Urge Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
For Fitness, Cutting Calories May Not Be Enough
Caffeine May Offer Some Skin Cancer Protection
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Topical Drugs May Pollute Waterways
Pollution Particles Impair Blood Vessel Function
Chemical in Plastics May Cause Fertility Problems
EYE CARE, VISION
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
FITNESS
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Less Education May Mean Poorer Health
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Add your Article

When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It

By Randy Dotinga
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Want to look younger or less tired? Focus on the area around your eyes, a new study suggests, because that's where people get visual clues about your age and level of fatigue.

When asked to estimate the age of people in photographs, participants in a study looked at the eye region almost half the time, researchers found. The number was about the same when the participants tried to figure out how tired people in the photographs were.

The findings might seem obvious, but the study's lead author, a plastic surgeon, said they're important because cosmetic-surgery patients don't always get treatment where they need it.

"They want to look younger and less tired, but if you look to see what's being offered them, it's often not things around the eyes," said Dr. Peter A. D. Rubin, a plastic surgeon in Brookline, Mass., and an associate professor of ophthalmology at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

Rubin and his colleagues launched the study to figure out how people gauge age and fatigue. "What better way than to see where are people actually looking when they're making these judgments about things?" he said.

The researchers recruited 47 college students -- 15 men, 32 women -- from the Boston area and told them to look at photographs of 48 older people on a computer monitor. The monitor analyzed reflections from the eye to determine where the study participants were looking. The participants then rated either the age or the fatigue level of the people in the photos.

When gauging the age of people, the students looked at the eye region 46 percent of the time, followed by the nose (19 percent), forehead (13 percent) and the area between the eyebrows (11 percent).

The numbers were similar when the students were trying to figure out how tired the people in the photos appeared.

The study findings were published in the February issue of the journal Ophthalmology.

The eye region makes up just 21 percent of the face, according to the study authors. So why does it seem to reveal so much?

"There is a lot going on around the eyes," Rubin said. For one thing, eyelids are the thinnest skin on the body, making swelling more prominent. Also, he said, the eye region undergoes many changes during aging and suffers from significant sun damage.

"Beauty is not only in the eye of the beholder," Rubin said. "It's also in the eye of the beholdee."

Timothy J. Slattery, a postdoctoral fellow in psychology at the University of California, San Diego, said the study findings reflect those of other research that has found that people fixate on the eyes when they look at photos of faces.

But the study does not prove that the eye region is the most important when it comes to judgments about age and fatigue, said Slattery, who tracks how the eye moves.

More information

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons has more about plastic surgery.



SOURCES: Peter A. D. Rubin, M.D., plastic surgeon, Brookline, Mass., and associate professor of ophthalmology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tenn.; Timothy J. Slattery, Ph.D., postdoctoral fellow in psychology, University of California, San Diego; February 2009, Ophthalmology

Last Updated: Feb. 02, 2009

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