ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Ginkgo No Shield Against Alzheimer's
Acupuncture Eases Breast Cancer Treatment Side Effects
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
A Winning Strategy to Beat Spring Sporting Injuries
Chronic Low Back Pain Is on the Rise
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
CANCER
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
CAREGIVING
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
Antioxidants Abound in Cereals, Popcorn, Whole-Grain Snacks
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Mediterranean Diet Enriched With Nuts Cuts Heart Risks
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
Vest Monitors 'Individual' Air Pollution
EYE CARE, VISION
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
FITNESS
Go To Work But Skip The Car
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
More Single Women Are Having Babies
Kids More Apt to Smoke If Mom Did While Pregnant
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Drink Away Dementia?
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
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Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Living in the city could lead to certain common cancers being diagnosed at much later stages of their development, new research has found.

A study of residents of Illinois finds that city dwellers are more likely to have doctors spot breast, colorectal, lung or prostate cancer later in the disease's progression than their peers residing in the suburbs or rural areas. The rates for these late-stage cancers were highest in Chicago, the most densely populated and urban of the areas in the analysis, and tapered off the more rural and sparse an area's population became, according to the findings, which were based on a review of the 1998 to 2002 Illinois State Cancer Registry.

"The concentration of health disadvantage in highly urbanized places emphasizes the need for more extensive urban-based cancer screening and education programs, especially programs targeted to the most vulnerable urban populations and neighborhoods," the study's authors, Sara L. McLafferty of the University of Illinois and Fahui Wang of Louisiana State University, wrote in their article, to be published in the June 15 print issue of the journal Cancer.

Age and race may account for much of the geographical difference in when colorectal and prostate cancers were diagnosed while they played a smaller role in the timing of breast cancer detection, the researchers noted. Urban blacks, for example, were much more likely to receive a late-stage diagnosis while older people living in rural areas were more likely to have their cancer diagnosed early because, it is speculated, this group is likely to visit doctors more often and receive age-related screenings for various diseases.

For lung cancer, the authors found that age and race did not explain the geographic disparities for stage of diagnosis, leading them to guess that other factors might be responsible.

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