ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Healthy adults have potential autoimmune disease-causing cells
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
CANCER
Vitamin C Shows Promise as Cancer Treatment
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
Selenium, Omega-3s May Stave Off Colorectal Cancer
CAREGIVING
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Vitamin B12 Key to Aging Brain
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Household Chemicals May Affect Cholesterol Levels
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
Old-Growth Forests Dying Off in U.S. West
EYE CARE, VISION
Blood Sugar Control Helps Diabetics Preserve Sight
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
FITNESS
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Seniors Who Exercise Help Their Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
Hidden Salt in Diet Haunts Many With Heart Failure
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
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Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Living in the city could lead to certain common cancers being diagnosed at much later stages of their development, new research has found.

A study of residents of Illinois finds that city dwellers are more likely to have doctors spot breast, colorectal, lung or prostate cancer later in the disease's progression than their peers residing in the suburbs or rural areas. The rates for these late-stage cancers were highest in Chicago, the most densely populated and urban of the areas in the analysis, and tapered off the more rural and sparse an area's population became, according to the findings, which were based on a review of the 1998 to 2002 Illinois State Cancer Registry.

"The concentration of health disadvantage in highly urbanized places emphasizes the need for more extensive urban-based cancer screening and education programs, especially programs targeted to the most vulnerable urban populations and neighborhoods," the study's authors, Sara L. McLafferty of the University of Illinois and Fahui Wang of Louisiana State University, wrote in their article, to be published in the June 15 print issue of the journal Cancer.

Age and race may account for much of the geographical difference in when colorectal and prostate cancers were diagnosed while they played a smaller role in the timing of breast cancer detection, the researchers noted. Urban blacks, for example, were much more likely to receive a late-stage diagnosis while older people living in rural areas were more likely to have their cancer diagnosed early because, it is speculated, this group is likely to visit doctors more often and receive age-related screenings for various diseases.

For lung cancer, the authors found that age and race did not explain the geographic disparities for stage of diagnosis, leading them to guess that other factors might be responsible.

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