ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
Brazilian Mint Tea Naturally Good for Pain Relief
Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85
CANCER
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
CAREGIVING
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
DIABETES
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Coffee or Tea Consumption May Lower Stroke Risk
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Walkable Neighborhoods Keep the Pounds Off
1976 Italian Dioxin Release Damaged Babies' Thyroids
Small Doses of Carbon Monoxide Might Help Stroke Victims
EYE CARE, VISION
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
FITNESS
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
Exercise 30 Minutes a Day? Who Knew!
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
What you need to know about swine flu.
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
SENIORS
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Any Old Cane Won't Do
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
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Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men

Men, want to keep high blood pressure at bay? Try reaching for whole grains.

That's the message from a Harvard study that found that whole grain foods and foods high in bran bring a boost to heart health. Although this study is among men, data from the Women's Health Study found similar results, the researchers say.

"Whole grains as a part of a prudent, balanced diet may help promote cardiovascular health," said lead researcher Dr. Alan J. Flint, project director at Harvard School of Public Health of the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, on which the new analysis was based. "Higher intake of whole grains was associated with a lower risk of hypertension in our cohort of over 31,000 men," Flint said.

The report is published in the September issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

For the study, Flint's team collected data on 31,684 men who participated in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. When these men were enrolled in the study, none had high blood pressure, cancer, heart disease or had had a stroke.

During 18 years of follow-up, over 9,200 men developed high blood pressure. The researchers found that men who ate the highest amount of whole grains were 19 percent less likely to develop high blood pressure compared with men who ate the least amount of whole grains.

In addition, men who ate the most bran reduced their risk of developing high blood pressure by 15 percent compared with men who ate the least bran, the study found.

Flint noted that these findings remained even after adjusting their data for other healthy lifestyle and diet factors. "When the associations persist despite these adjustments, as in the current analysis, it supports the conclusion that it is not due to these other factors," he said.

There have been several suggestions as to why whole grains seem to have an effect on blood pressure. These include improved insulin sensitivity, reduced food intake, lower blood sugar, better control of high blood pressure and less need for blood pressure medications, the researchers noted.

The authors say the findings could help in evaluating diet guidelines to help lower blood pressure.

Connecticut-based nutritionist Samantha Heller agreed that whole grains are an important part of a healthy diet.

"Whole grains have nutrients and antioxidants that are important for good health and they help manage insulin response," Heller said. "People who eat whole grains seem to have lower incidents of diseases like diabetes," she said.

Since whole grains also help manage weight, they seem to reduce the risk of heart disease, she said.

However, Dr. Harlan M. Krumholz, the Harold H. Hines, Jr. Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology and Public Health at Yale University School of Medicine doesn't think this finding has any implications for dietary guidelines.

"This epidemiologic study is an interesting academic study but lacks any policy implications," Krumholz said. "We do not know whether enriching your diet with fiber will have any benefit on the development of hypertension," he said.
SOURCES: Alan J. Flint, M.D., Dr.P.H., Project Director, Health Professionals Follow-up Study, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston; Samantha Heller, R.D., C.D.N., registered dietitian, clinical nutritionist, exercise physiologist, Fairfield, Conn.; Harlan M. Krumholz, M.D., Harold H. Hines Jr. Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn.; September 2009 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition Published on: August 28, 2009