ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
A Winning Strategy to Beat Spring Sporting Injuries
CANCER
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Mom's Smoking May Lead to SIDS
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
3 Steps Might Help Stop MRSA's Spread
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
DIABETES
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Greenhouse Gases Hazardous to Your Health
Gene Explains How High-Fructose Diets Lead to Insulin Resistance
Air Pollution Raises Risk of Heart Disease, Death
EYE CARE, VISION
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
FITNESS
Exercise 30 Minutes a Day? Who Knew!
Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
The Yearly Flu Shot Debate
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
Any Old Cane Won't Do
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Natural Therapies for Menopause
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Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men

Men, want to keep high blood pressure at bay? Try reaching for whole grains.

That's the message from a Harvard study that found that whole grain foods and foods high in bran bring a boost to heart health. Although this study is among men, data from the Women's Health Study found similar results, the researchers say.

"Whole grains as a part of a prudent, balanced diet may help promote cardiovascular health," said lead researcher Dr. Alan J. Flint, project director at Harvard School of Public Health of the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, on which the new analysis was based. "Higher intake of whole grains was associated with a lower risk of hypertension in our cohort of over 31,000 men," Flint said.

The report is published in the September issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

For the study, Flint's team collected data on 31,684 men who participated in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. When these men were enrolled in the study, none had high blood pressure, cancer, heart disease or had had a stroke.

During 18 years of follow-up, over 9,200 men developed high blood pressure. The researchers found that men who ate the highest amount of whole grains were 19 percent less likely to develop high blood pressure compared with men who ate the least amount of whole grains.

In addition, men who ate the most bran reduced their risk of developing high blood pressure by 15 percent compared with men who ate the least bran, the study found.

Flint noted that these findings remained even after adjusting their data for other healthy lifestyle and diet factors. "When the associations persist despite these adjustments, as in the current analysis, it supports the conclusion that it is not due to these other factors," he said.

There have been several suggestions as to why whole grains seem to have an effect on blood pressure. These include improved insulin sensitivity, reduced food intake, lower blood sugar, better control of high blood pressure and less need for blood pressure medications, the researchers noted.

The authors say the findings could help in evaluating diet guidelines to help lower blood pressure.

Connecticut-based nutritionist Samantha Heller agreed that whole grains are an important part of a healthy diet.

"Whole grains have nutrients and antioxidants that are important for good health and they help manage insulin response," Heller said. "People who eat whole grains seem to have lower incidents of diseases like diabetes," she said.

Since whole grains also help manage weight, they seem to reduce the risk of heart disease, she said.

However, Dr. Harlan M. Krumholz, the Harold H. Hines, Jr. Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology and Public Health at Yale University School of Medicine doesn't think this finding has any implications for dietary guidelines.

"This epidemiologic study is an interesting academic study but lacks any policy implications," Krumholz said. "We do not know whether enriching your diet with fiber will have any benefit on the development of hypertension," he said.
SOURCES: Alan J. Flint, M.D., Dr.P.H., Project Director, Health Professionals Follow-up Study, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston; Samantha Heller, R.D., C.D.N., registered dietitian, clinical nutritionist, exercise physiologist, Fairfield, Conn.; Harlan M. Krumholz, M.D., Harold H. Hines Jr. Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn.; September 2009 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition Published on: August 28, 2009