ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Soccer's a Winner for Building Bone Health in Girls
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
Most Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Lack Vitamin D
CANCER
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
CAREGIVING
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
For Dialysis Patients, More Pills = Lower Quality of Life
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Is It Safe to Go in the Gulf Coast's Water?
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
FITNESS
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
SENIORS
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Add your Article

Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Brown rice is better than white rice at reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes, but whole grains are the most effective at lowering the risk, study findings show.

U.S. researchers analyzed data from 39,765 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and 157,463 women in the Nurses' Health Study I and II. None of the participants had diabetes, heart disease or cancer at the start of the studies. Their consumption of brown and white rice, as well as other foods, was assessed every two to four years.

During 3.3 million person-years of follow-up, there were 10,507 incidents of type 2 diabetes. After adjusting for a number of dietary and lifestyle risk factors, the researchers found that people who ate five or more servings per week of white rice were 17 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who ate less than one serving of white rice per month.

In contrast, people who ate two or more servings of brown rice per week were 11 percent less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who ate less than one serving of brown rice per month, the study authors reported.

"We estimated that replacing 50 grams/day intake of white rice with the same amount of brown rice was associated with a 16 percent lower risk of type 2 diabetes, whereas the same replacement with whole grains as a group was associated with a 36 percent lower diabetes risk," wrote Dr. Qi Sun, of Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, and colleagues.

The study was to be presented Wednesday at the American Heart Association's Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism Conference in San Francisco.
SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, March 3, 2010

Last Updated: March 04, 2010