ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
CANCER
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
CAREGIVING
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
DIABETES
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Eat Light - Live Longer
Coffee or Tea Consumption May Lower Stroke Risk
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Bed Bugs Bring No Disease Danger
Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
EYE CARE, VISION
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
FITNESS
Avoiding a Holiday Season of Discontent
Seniors Who Exercise Help Their Health
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Cocaine Spurs Long-Term Change in Brain Chemistry
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Swine Flu May Pose Problems for Pregnant Women
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Add your Article

Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Brown rice is better than white rice at reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes, but whole grains are the most effective at lowering the risk, study findings show.

U.S. researchers analyzed data from 39,765 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and 157,463 women in the Nurses' Health Study I and II. None of the participants had diabetes, heart disease or cancer at the start of the studies. Their consumption of brown and white rice, as well as other foods, was assessed every two to four years.

During 3.3 million person-years of follow-up, there were 10,507 incidents of type 2 diabetes. After adjusting for a number of dietary and lifestyle risk factors, the researchers found that people who ate five or more servings per week of white rice were 17 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who ate less than one serving of white rice per month.

In contrast, people who ate two or more servings of brown rice per week were 11 percent less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who ate less than one serving of brown rice per month, the study authors reported.

"We estimated that replacing 50 grams/day intake of white rice with the same amount of brown rice was associated with a 16 percent lower risk of type 2 diabetes, whereas the same replacement with whole grains as a group was associated with a 36 percent lower diabetes risk," wrote Dr. Qi Sun, of Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, and colleagues.

The study was to be presented Wednesday at the American Heart Association's Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism Conference in San Francisco.
SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, March 3, 2010

Last Updated: March 04, 2010