ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Varicose, Spider Veins May Be Inevitable for Some
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
CANCER
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
Gene Studies Reveal Cancer's Secrets
CAREGIVING
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
Are Hospital Mobile Phones Dialing Up Superbugs?
Many Alzheimer's Caregivers Admit to Abusive Behavior
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee or Tea Consumption May Lower Stroke Risk
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Is It Safe to Go in the Gulf Coast's Water?
Cleaning House May Be Risky for Women With Asthma
Walkable Neighborhoods Keep the Pounds Off
EYE CARE, VISION
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
FITNESS
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Cocaine Spurs Long-Term Change in Brain Chemistry
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
FDA Bans Unapproved Prescription Cough, Cold and Allergy Meds
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Quick Orthopedic Repair Can Save Young Shoulders
Boosting Kids' Stroke IQ May Save Lives
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
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Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Brown rice is better than white rice at reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes, but whole grains are the most effective at lowering the risk, study findings show.

U.S. researchers analyzed data from 39,765 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and 157,463 women in the Nurses' Health Study I and II. None of the participants had diabetes, heart disease or cancer at the start of the studies. Their consumption of brown and white rice, as well as other foods, was assessed every two to four years.

During 3.3 million person-years of follow-up, there were 10,507 incidents of type 2 diabetes. After adjusting for a number of dietary and lifestyle risk factors, the researchers found that people who ate five or more servings per week of white rice were 17 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who ate less than one serving of white rice per month.

In contrast, people who ate two or more servings of brown rice per week were 11 percent less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who ate less than one serving of brown rice per month, the study authors reported.

"We estimated that replacing 50 grams/day intake of white rice with the same amount of brown rice was associated with a 16 percent lower risk of type 2 diabetes, whereas the same replacement with whole grains as a group was associated with a 36 percent lower diabetes risk," wrote Dr. Qi Sun, of Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, and colleagues.

The study was to be presented Wednesday at the American Heart Association's Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism Conference in San Francisco.
SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, March 3, 2010

Last Updated: March 04, 2010