ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
CANCER
More Americans Urged to Get Cancer Screenings
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
CAREGIVING
Omega-3 Fatty Acid May Help 'Preemie' Girls' Brains
Rapid Infant Weight Gain Linked to Childhood Obesity
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
Iced Teas Pose High Risk of Kidney Stones
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Household Chemicals May Affect Cholesterol Levels
Sunken, Unexploded Bombs Pose Cancer Risk
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
EYE CARE, VISION
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
FITNESS
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Be Healthy, Spend Less
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Add your Article

Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Brown rice is better than white rice at reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes, but whole grains are the most effective at lowering the risk, study findings show.

U.S. researchers analyzed data from 39,765 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and 157,463 women in the Nurses' Health Study I and II. None of the participants had diabetes, heart disease or cancer at the start of the studies. Their consumption of brown and white rice, as well as other foods, was assessed every two to four years.

During 3.3 million person-years of follow-up, there were 10,507 incidents of type 2 diabetes. After adjusting for a number of dietary and lifestyle risk factors, the researchers found that people who ate five or more servings per week of white rice were 17 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who ate less than one serving of white rice per month.

In contrast, people who ate two or more servings of brown rice per week were 11 percent less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who ate less than one serving of brown rice per month, the study authors reported.

"We estimated that replacing 50 grams/day intake of white rice with the same amount of brown rice was associated with a 16 percent lower risk of type 2 diabetes, whereas the same replacement with whole grains as a group was associated with a 36 percent lower diabetes risk," wrote Dr. Qi Sun, of Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, and colleagues.

The study was to be presented Wednesday at the American Heart Association's Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism Conference in San Francisco.
SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, March 3, 2010

Last Updated: March 04, 2010