ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Scientists ID New Genes Tied to Crohn's Disease
Genes May Help Drive Rotator Cuff Injury
CANCER
Herb May Counter Liver Damage From Chemo
Breast Self-Exam Rates Go Up With Counseling
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
CAREGIVING
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
With Age Comes Greater Risk of Hypothermia
Many Alzheimer's Caregivers Admit to Abusive Behavior
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
DIABETES
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
DIET, NUTRITION
More Educated Choose Healthier Foods, But Pay More
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Imagine Food Aromas That Prevent Overeating
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment
Improved Fungicides May Be Easier on Environment
EYE CARE, VISION
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
Blood Sugar Control Helps Diabetics Preserve Sight
FITNESS
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
The Yearly Flu Shot Debate
Smog Tougher on the Obese
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
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Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers

Frigid temperatures can pose health risks, especially for young children, seniors and people with chronic illnesses, warns the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The agency said people need to take steps to protect themselves from cold-related injuries and check to make sure their family, friends and neighbors are safe and warm during wintry weather periods.

Frostbite and hypothermia are two of the most common cold weather-related dangers. Frostbite causes skin to initially appear red and feel painful. Left untreated, skin will turn white or grayish and feel firm, waxy or numb. Hypothermia symptoms include shivering, exhaustion, confusion, fumbling hands, memory problems, drowsiness and slurred speech. People with symptoms of frostbite or hypothermia should seek immediate medical attention, the CDC advised.

When the temperature plummets, stay inside in homes and buildings that are properly heated. If your home isn't heated, you should find other ways to keep warm:

* Wear winter clothing indoors, including layers of warm clothes, as well as socks, shoes and hats. Use blankets for additional warmth.
* Close off unused, exterior rooms and have people gather together in a single interior room.
* Seek shelter in heated public locations, such as malls, libraries and homeless shelters.

The CDC also offered tips for people who have to go outside in frigid weather:

* Wear proper outdoor clothing, including layers of light, warm clothing along with hats, scarves, mittens and waterproof boots.
* Be aware of the wind chill factor.
* Work slowly when doing outside chores.
* Take a friend and an emergency kit when doing outdoor recreational activities.
* Carry a cell phone.
* Don't travel when the weather service has issued advisories. If you must travel, tell a friend or relative about your proposed route and expected time of arrival.
* Sprinkle cat litter on icy patches.

SOURCES: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, news release, Jan. 5, 2010 Published on: January 06, 2010