ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Extra Pounds in Mid-Life Affect Later Mobility
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
'Snowbirds' Beware the Climate Changes
CANCER
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
CAREGIVING
Reduce Suffering, Urge Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
DIABETES
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
The Food Irradiation Story
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
Go Healthy, Not Hungry for Holiday Eating
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Sunken, Unexploded Bombs Pose Cancer Risk
EPA Alerts Seniors to Carbon Monoxide Dangers
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
EYE CARE, VISION
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Want Sun Protection? Wear Red or Blue
Treat symptoms (result of disease) or diagnose systems (cause of disease)?
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Add your Article

Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers

Frigid temperatures can pose health risks, especially for young children, seniors and people with chronic illnesses, warns the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The agency said people need to take steps to protect themselves from cold-related injuries and check to make sure their family, friends and neighbors are safe and warm during wintry weather periods.

Frostbite and hypothermia are two of the most common cold weather-related dangers. Frostbite causes skin to initially appear red and feel painful. Left untreated, skin will turn white or grayish and feel firm, waxy or numb. Hypothermia symptoms include shivering, exhaustion, confusion, fumbling hands, memory problems, drowsiness and slurred speech. People with symptoms of frostbite or hypothermia should seek immediate medical attention, the CDC advised.

When the temperature plummets, stay inside in homes and buildings that are properly heated. If your home isn't heated, you should find other ways to keep warm:

* Wear winter clothing indoors, including layers of warm clothes, as well as socks, shoes and hats. Use blankets for additional warmth.
* Close off unused, exterior rooms and have people gather together in a single interior room.
* Seek shelter in heated public locations, such as malls, libraries and homeless shelters.

The CDC also offered tips for people who have to go outside in frigid weather:

* Wear proper outdoor clothing, including layers of light, warm clothing along with hats, scarves, mittens and waterproof boots.
* Be aware of the wind chill factor.
* Work slowly when doing outside chores.
* Take a friend and an emergency kit when doing outdoor recreational activities.
* Carry a cell phone.
* Don't travel when the weather service has issued advisories. If you must travel, tell a friend or relative about your proposed route and expected time of arrival.
* Sprinkle cat litter on icy patches.

SOURCES: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, news release, Jan. 5, 2010 Published on: January 06, 2010