ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
CANCER
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
Simpler Sleep Apnea Treatment Seems Effective, Affordable
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
DIABETES
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
DIET, NUTRITION
Go Healthy, Not Hungry for Holiday Eating
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
FDA Faulted for Stance on Chemical in Plastics
Cats Can Trigger Eczema in Some Infants
Short-Term Air Pollution Exposure May Damage DNA
EYE CARE, VISION
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
FITNESS
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
It Pays to Eat Less as You Age
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Ginkgo Won't Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke in Elderly
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
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Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers

Frigid temperatures can pose health risks, especially for young children, seniors and people with chronic illnesses, warns the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The agency said people need to take steps to protect themselves from cold-related injuries and check to make sure their family, friends and neighbors are safe and warm during wintry weather periods.

Frostbite and hypothermia are two of the most common cold weather-related dangers. Frostbite causes skin to initially appear red and feel painful. Left untreated, skin will turn white or grayish and feel firm, waxy or numb. Hypothermia symptoms include shivering, exhaustion, confusion, fumbling hands, memory problems, drowsiness and slurred speech. People with symptoms of frostbite or hypothermia should seek immediate medical attention, the CDC advised.

When the temperature plummets, stay inside in homes and buildings that are properly heated. If your home isn't heated, you should find other ways to keep warm:

* Wear winter clothing indoors, including layers of warm clothes, as well as socks, shoes and hats. Use blankets for additional warmth.
* Close off unused, exterior rooms and have people gather together in a single interior room.
* Seek shelter in heated public locations, such as malls, libraries and homeless shelters.

The CDC also offered tips for people who have to go outside in frigid weather:

* Wear proper outdoor clothing, including layers of light, warm clothing along with hats, scarves, mittens and waterproof boots.
* Be aware of the wind chill factor.
* Work slowly when doing outside chores.
* Take a friend and an emergency kit when doing outdoor recreational activities.
* Carry a cell phone.
* Don't travel when the weather service has issued advisories. If you must travel, tell a friend or relative about your proposed route and expected time of arrival.
* Sprinkle cat litter on icy patches.

SOURCES: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, news release, Jan. 5, 2010 Published on: January 06, 2010