ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
Many Americans Fall Short on Their Vitamin D
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
CANCER
Scams and Shams That Prey on Cancer Patients
More Americans Urged to Get Cancer Screenings
Yoga Eases Sleep Problems Among Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Are Hospital Mobile Phones Dialing Up Superbugs?
Recession Scrambling Health Spending in U.S.
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
DIABETES
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
Many Kids Don't Need the Vitamins They're Taking
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Greenhouse Gases Hazardous to Your Health
Arsenic in Drinking Water Raises Diabetes Risk
Hurricane Threats: Time to Batten Down the Hatches
EYE CARE, VISION
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
FITNESS
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
Seniors Who Exercise Help Their Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Spread of Swine Flu in Japan Could Raise WHO Alert to Highest Level
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
The Brain Comes Alive With the Sounds of Music
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
MEN'S HEALTH
Countdown to Hair Loss
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Add your Article

With Age Comes Greater Risk of Hypothermia

SATURDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Older people often focus their wintertime worries on fears of slipping on the ice, but they ought to be equally concerned about the risks of being too cold, advises the U.S. National Institute on Aging.

The ability to endure lengthy exposure to the cold lessens as people age, putting the elderly at a greater risk for hypothermia -- the condition in which body temperature falls below normal and stays there for a prolonged period of time.

Certain medical conditions, medicines and a sedentary lifestyle can make older people extra vulnerable even to mild cold snaps.

But there are steps older adults can take to prevent hypothermia, including:

* Dress in several layers of loose clothing when going out. Wear a hat, scarf, gloves or mittens, along with a warm coat.
* Wear long underwear under your clothes, along with socks and slippers, when inside. Use a blanket or afghan to keep legs and shoulders warm. Wear a hat or cap indoors if necessary.
* Set the thermostat to at least 68 degrees. Home temperatures from 60 to 65 degrees can trigger hypothermia in older people.
* Check with your doctor to see if any of your medications -- whether prescription or over-the-counter -- might increase your risk for hypothermia.

People with hypothermia tend to act confused, slow or sleepy, have slowed or slurred speech and might shiver or have stiffness in the limbs. If you suspect someone has hypothermia, take the person's temperature, and if it is 96 degrees or lower, call 911.

Cold temperatures resulted in more than 6,000 hospitalizations and 827 deaths in 2006, according to the latest figures the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The group's analysis of 6,182 cold weather-related hospitalizations found that:

* Men accounted for about 40 percent more hospitalizations for exposure to cold than women.
* People 65 and older were hospitalized for cold-related incidents almost 7 times more than people age 18 to 44 and 3 times more than those 45 to 64.
* Hypothermia (which can cause loss of physical and mental abilities and, in extreme cases, death), frostbite, respiratory failure, and pneumonia were the most common reasons for cold weather-related hospitalizations.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about hypothermia.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCES: U.S. National Institute on Aging, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, news releases, January 2009

Last Updated: Jan. 31, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com