ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
Needling Away Your Headaches With Acupuncture
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Healthy adults have potential autoimmune disease-causing cells
Get in Step With Summer Foot Care
CANCER
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
DIET, NUTRITION
The Food Irradiation Story
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
The High-Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) Debate
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
FDA Faulted for Stance on Chemical in Plastics
Most Mt. Everest Deaths Occur Near Summit During Descent
Pilots May Face Greater Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
FITNESS
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Biomarkers May Help Measure Rate of Decline in Dementia
Vitamin E Helps Treat Common Liver Disease
Toxins May Form When Skin, Indoor Ozone Meet
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Psychiatric Drugs Might Raise Cardiac Death Risk
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Don't Leave Your Kids In The Car !
Combo Treatment Eases Wheezing in Babies
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
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With Age Comes Greater Risk of Hypothermia

SATURDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Older people often focus their wintertime worries on fears of slipping on the ice, but they ought to be equally concerned about the risks of being too cold, advises the U.S. National Institute on Aging.

The ability to endure lengthy exposure to the cold lessens as people age, putting the elderly at a greater risk for hypothermia -- the condition in which body temperature falls below normal and stays there for a prolonged period of time.

Certain medical conditions, medicines and a sedentary lifestyle can make older people extra vulnerable even to mild cold snaps.

But there are steps older adults can take to prevent hypothermia, including:

* Dress in several layers of loose clothing when going out. Wear a hat, scarf, gloves or mittens, along with a warm coat.
* Wear long underwear under your clothes, along with socks and slippers, when inside. Use a blanket or afghan to keep legs and shoulders warm. Wear a hat or cap indoors if necessary.
* Set the thermostat to at least 68 degrees. Home temperatures from 60 to 65 degrees can trigger hypothermia in older people.
* Check with your doctor to see if any of your medications -- whether prescription or over-the-counter -- might increase your risk for hypothermia.

People with hypothermia tend to act confused, slow or sleepy, have slowed or slurred speech and might shiver or have stiffness in the limbs. If you suspect someone has hypothermia, take the person's temperature, and if it is 96 degrees or lower, call 911.

Cold temperatures resulted in more than 6,000 hospitalizations and 827 deaths in 2006, according to the latest figures the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The group's analysis of 6,182 cold weather-related hospitalizations found that:

* Men accounted for about 40 percent more hospitalizations for exposure to cold than women.
* People 65 and older were hospitalized for cold-related incidents almost 7 times more than people age 18 to 44 and 3 times more than those 45 to 64.
* Hypothermia (which can cause loss of physical and mental abilities and, in extreme cases, death), frostbite, respiratory failure, and pneumonia were the most common reasons for cold weather-related hospitalizations.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about hypothermia.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCES: U.S. National Institute on Aging, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, news releases, January 2009

Last Updated: Jan. 31, 2009

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