ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
Osteoporosis May Raise Risk for Vertigo
CANCER
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
CAREGIVING
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Recession Scrambling Health Spending in U.S.
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Holistic Dentistry-My View
DIABETES
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
The Food Irradiation Story
Myrrh May Lower High Cholesterol
Fruits, Vegetables, Teas May Cut Smokers' Cancer Risk
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
FDA Faulted for Stance on Chemical in Plastics
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
FITNESS
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Health Gains From Lowered Smoking Rates in Jeopardy
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Boosting Kids' Stroke IQ May Save Lives
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
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Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight teens, or those who believe they are, are more likely than other teens to attempt suicide, according to a U.S. study.

Researchers looked at more than 14,000 high school students to determine if there's a link between suicide attempts and body mass index (BMI), as well as a teen's belief that he or she might be overweight -- whether it's true or not.

The study found that teens who were overweight and those who believed they were overweight were more likely to attempt suicide than those who weren't and those who didn't believe they were overweight. The findings were equally strong for girls and boys.

The study appears online in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

"Our findings show that both perceived and actual overweight increase risk for suicide attempt," the study's lead author, Monica Swahn, an associate dean for research at the College of Health and Human Sciences and an associate professor in the Institute of Public Health at Georgia State University, said in a news release from the school.

"This is a major concern since more and more children and youth are becoming overweight and obese," she said.

A better understanding of the link between weight issues and suicide risk in teens can help in the development of appropriate strategies for suicide prevention, according to the researchers.

"We cannot only focus prevention strategies on those who are overweight and who are concerned about their weight, but we also need to include youth who feel that they are overweight even though they may not be," Swahn said. She added that teens "feel very pressured to fit in and to fit certain limited ideals of beauty."

Dr. Hatim Omar, chief of the Division of Adolescent Medicine at the University of Kentucky, said in the news release that the study "adds another wake-up call to providers, parents, teachers and society about the need for screening for depression and suicide risk in all teens, with special attention to teens with perceived or actual obesity."

More information

Mental Health America has more about teen suicide.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Center for the Advancement of Health, news release, May 18, 2009

Last Updated: May 18, 2009

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