ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
Fall Sports Peak Time for Lower Leg Damage
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
CAREGIVING
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
Flu Strikes a Milder Blow This Season
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
DIABETES
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
Adults Need To Get Thier Food Facts Straight
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
Climate Change Linked to Longer Pollen Seasons
EYE CARE, VISION
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
FITNESS
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Sleep and Do Better
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Workplace Wellness Seems to Really Work
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Pool Chemicals Raise Kids Allergy, Asthma Risk
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
The Unmedicated Mind
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
SENIORS
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
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Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight teens, or those who believe they are, are more likely than other teens to attempt suicide, according to a U.S. study.

Researchers looked at more than 14,000 high school students to determine if there's a link between suicide attempts and body mass index (BMI), as well as a teen's belief that he or she might be overweight -- whether it's true or not.

The study found that teens who were overweight and those who believed they were overweight were more likely to attempt suicide than those who weren't and those who didn't believe they were overweight. The findings were equally strong for girls and boys.

The study appears online in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

"Our findings show that both perceived and actual overweight increase risk for suicide attempt," the study's lead author, Monica Swahn, an associate dean for research at the College of Health and Human Sciences and an associate professor in the Institute of Public Health at Georgia State University, said in a news release from the school.

"This is a major concern since more and more children and youth are becoming overweight and obese," she said.

A better understanding of the link between weight issues and suicide risk in teens can help in the development of appropriate strategies for suicide prevention, according to the researchers.

"We cannot only focus prevention strategies on those who are overweight and who are concerned about their weight, but we also need to include youth who feel that they are overweight even though they may not be," Swahn said. She added that teens "feel very pressured to fit in and to fit certain limited ideals of beauty."

Dr. Hatim Omar, chief of the Division of Adolescent Medicine at the University of Kentucky, said in the news release that the study "adds another wake-up call to providers, parents, teachers and society about the need for screening for depression and suicide risk in all teens, with special attention to teens with perceived or actual obesity."

More information

Mental Health America has more about teen suicide.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Center for the Advancement of Health, news release, May 18, 2009

Last Updated: May 18, 2009

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