ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Pain More a Cause of Arthritis Than a Symptom
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tequila Plant May Help Fight Bone Loss
CANCER
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
CAREGIVING
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
DIABETES
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
DIET, NUTRITION
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
The Food Irradiation Story
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Clear Skies Have Become Less So Over Time, Data Show
Cats Can Trigger Eczema in Some Infants
Chemicals in Carpets, Non-Stick Pans Tied to Thyroid Disease
EYE CARE, VISION
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
FITNESS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Workplace Wellness Seems to Really Work
Good Sleepers More Likely to Eat Right
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
SENIORS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
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Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight teens, or those who believe they are, are more likely than other teens to attempt suicide, according to a U.S. study.

Researchers looked at more than 14,000 high school students to determine if there's a link between suicide attempts and body mass index (BMI), as well as a teen's belief that he or she might be overweight -- whether it's true or not.

The study found that teens who were overweight and those who believed they were overweight were more likely to attempt suicide than those who weren't and those who didn't believe they were overweight. The findings were equally strong for girls and boys.

The study appears online in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

"Our findings show that both perceived and actual overweight increase risk for suicide attempt," the study's lead author, Monica Swahn, an associate dean for research at the College of Health and Human Sciences and an associate professor in the Institute of Public Health at Georgia State University, said in a news release from the school.

"This is a major concern since more and more children and youth are becoming overweight and obese," she said.

A better understanding of the link between weight issues and suicide risk in teens can help in the development of appropriate strategies for suicide prevention, according to the researchers.

"We cannot only focus prevention strategies on those who are overweight and who are concerned about their weight, but we also need to include youth who feel that they are overweight even though they may not be," Swahn said. She added that teens "feel very pressured to fit in and to fit certain limited ideals of beauty."

Dr. Hatim Omar, chief of the Division of Adolescent Medicine at the University of Kentucky, said in the news release that the study "adds another wake-up call to providers, parents, teachers and society about the need for screening for depression and suicide risk in all teens, with special attention to teens with perceived or actual obesity."

More information

Mental Health America has more about teen suicide.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Center for the Advancement of Health, news release, May 18, 2009

Last Updated: May 18, 2009

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