ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
CANCER
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
CAREGIVING
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
DIET, NUTRITION
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
What's Cookin'? It Could Be Air Pollution
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Prenatal Exposure to Traffic Pollution May Lead to Asthma
EYE CARE, VISION
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
FITNESS
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
New Methods Could Speed Production of Flu Vaccines
The Yearly Flu Shot Debate
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
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Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight teens, or those who believe they are, are more likely than other teens to attempt suicide, according to a U.S. study.

Researchers looked at more than 14,000 high school students to determine if there's a link between suicide attempts and body mass index (BMI), as well as a teen's belief that he or she might be overweight -- whether it's true or not.

The study found that teens who were overweight and those who believed they were overweight were more likely to attempt suicide than those who weren't and those who didn't believe they were overweight. The findings were equally strong for girls and boys.

The study appears online in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

"Our findings show that both perceived and actual overweight increase risk for suicide attempt," the study's lead author, Monica Swahn, an associate dean for research at the College of Health and Human Sciences and an associate professor in the Institute of Public Health at Georgia State University, said in a news release from the school.

"This is a major concern since more and more children and youth are becoming overweight and obese," she said.

A better understanding of the link between weight issues and suicide risk in teens can help in the development of appropriate strategies for suicide prevention, according to the researchers.

"We cannot only focus prevention strategies on those who are overweight and who are concerned about their weight, but we also need to include youth who feel that they are overweight even though they may not be," Swahn said. She added that teens "feel very pressured to fit in and to fit certain limited ideals of beauty."

Dr. Hatim Omar, chief of the Division of Adolescent Medicine at the University of Kentucky, said in the news release that the study "adds another wake-up call to providers, parents, teachers and society about the need for screening for depression and suicide risk in all teens, with special attention to teens with perceived or actual obesity."

More information

Mental Health America has more about teen suicide.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Center for the Advancement of Health, news release, May 18, 2009

Last Updated: May 18, 2009

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