ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
CANCER
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Minorities Distrust Medical System More
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
CAREGIVING
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee or Tea Consumption May Lower Stroke Risk
Antioxidant-Rich Foods Lose Nutritional Luster Over Time
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
Cats Can Trigger Eczema in Some Infants
Green Areas Lower Health Inequities Between Rich, Poor
EYE CARE, VISION
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
FITNESS
Fliers Can Keep Blood Clots at Bay
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Vitamin D Best Taken With Largest Meal of Day, Study Finds
Dr Churchill & Ashley Pelton Interview 1 of 4
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
Don't Leave Your Kids In The Car !
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
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Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight teens, or those who believe they are, are more likely than other teens to attempt suicide, according to a U.S. study.

Researchers looked at more than 14,000 high school students to determine if there's a link between suicide attempts and body mass index (BMI), as well as a teen's belief that he or she might be overweight -- whether it's true or not.

The study found that teens who were overweight and those who believed they were overweight were more likely to attempt suicide than those who weren't and those who didn't believe they were overweight. The findings were equally strong for girls and boys.

The study appears online in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

"Our findings show that both perceived and actual overweight increase risk for suicide attempt," the study's lead author, Monica Swahn, an associate dean for research at the College of Health and Human Sciences and an associate professor in the Institute of Public Health at Georgia State University, said in a news release from the school.

"This is a major concern since more and more children and youth are becoming overweight and obese," she said.

A better understanding of the link between weight issues and suicide risk in teens can help in the development of appropriate strategies for suicide prevention, according to the researchers.

"We cannot only focus prevention strategies on those who are overweight and who are concerned about their weight, but we also need to include youth who feel that they are overweight even though they may not be," Swahn said. She added that teens "feel very pressured to fit in and to fit certain limited ideals of beauty."

Dr. Hatim Omar, chief of the Division of Adolescent Medicine at the University of Kentucky, said in the news release that the study "adds another wake-up call to providers, parents, teachers and society about the need for screening for depression and suicide risk in all teens, with special attention to teens with perceived or actual obesity."

More information

Mental Health America has more about teen suicide.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Center for the Advancement of Health, news release, May 18, 2009

Last Updated: May 18, 2009

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