ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Healthy adults have potential autoimmune disease-causing cells
Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
CANCER
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
CAREGIVING
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Vegan or Raw-Vegan at Regular Restaurants
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
Eat Up, But Eat Healthy This Holiday Season
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
1976 Italian Dioxin Release Damaged Babies' Thyroids
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Air Pollution Raises Risk of Heart Disease, Death
EYE CARE, VISION
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
FITNESS
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Toxins May Form When Skin, Indoor Ozone Meet
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Hidden Salt in Diet Haunts Many With Heart Failure
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
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Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight teens, or those who believe they are, are more likely than other teens to attempt suicide, according to a U.S. study.

Researchers looked at more than 14,000 high school students to determine if there's a link between suicide attempts and body mass index (BMI), as well as a teen's belief that he or she might be overweight -- whether it's true or not.

The study found that teens who were overweight and those who believed they were overweight were more likely to attempt suicide than those who weren't and those who didn't believe they were overweight. The findings were equally strong for girls and boys.

The study appears online in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

"Our findings show that both perceived and actual overweight increase risk for suicide attempt," the study's lead author, Monica Swahn, an associate dean for research at the College of Health and Human Sciences and an associate professor in the Institute of Public Health at Georgia State University, said in a news release from the school.

"This is a major concern since more and more children and youth are becoming overweight and obese," she said.

A better understanding of the link between weight issues and suicide risk in teens can help in the development of appropriate strategies for suicide prevention, according to the researchers.

"We cannot only focus prevention strategies on those who are overweight and who are concerned about their weight, but we also need to include youth who feel that they are overweight even though they may not be," Swahn said. She added that teens "feel very pressured to fit in and to fit certain limited ideals of beauty."

Dr. Hatim Omar, chief of the Division of Adolescent Medicine at the University of Kentucky, said in the news release that the study "adds another wake-up call to providers, parents, teachers and society about the need for screening for depression and suicide risk in all teens, with special attention to teens with perceived or actual obesity."

More information

Mental Health America has more about teen suicide.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Center for the Advancement of Health, news release, May 18, 2009

Last Updated: May 18, 2009

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