ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
High Birth Weight Doubles Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
CAREGIVING
Reduce Suffering, Urge Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
DIABETES
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Mediterranean Diet Enriched With Nuts Cuts Heart Risks
Mediterranean Diet Helps Protect Aging Brain
Eating Less May Slow Aging Process
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Household Chemicals May Affect Cholesterol Levels
Gene Explains How High-Fructose Diets Lead to Insulin Resistance
Gas Cooking Might Up Your Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
FITNESS
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Exercise 30 Minutes a Day? Who Knew!
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Natural Therapies for Menopause
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Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation

MONDAY, April 13 (HealthDay News) -- Acupressure wristbands might help cancer patients experience almost a 25 percent less nausea during radiation treatments, a new study says.

The finding, published in the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, also discounted the common belief that such non-Western medical treatments act more as a placebo than an actual pain reliever.

"We know the placebo effect exists; the problem is that we don't know how to measure it very well," corresponding author Joseph A. Roscoe, a research associate professor at the James P. Wilmot Cancer Center at the University of Rochester Medical Center, said in a university news release. "In this study, we attempted to manipulate the information we gave to patients to see if their expectations about nausea could be changed. As it turned out, our information to change people's expectations had no effect, but we still found that the wristbands reduce nausea symptoms."

The wristbands put pressure on a "nausea point" identified by traditional Chinese acupuncture. The pressure acts to change the flow of universal chi energy, according to the Eastern belief.

The study involved 88 people who experienced nausea after radiation treatments for cancer. Some were given wristbands to wear, and the others were not. And about half of those in the wristband group were also given information that explicitly said the wristbands cut down on nausea, whereas handouts given to the others with wristbands contained more neutral information.

Those with wristbands experienced a 24 percent decrease in nausea, regardless of which set of information they were given before the experiment. The group without wristbands reported just a 5 percent lessening of nausea.

"Some of our body's feelings and sensations are ambiguous and subject to interpretation," Roscoe said. "Your mind cannot make a blister go away or reduce hair loss, but it can interpret ambiguous abdominal sensations and decide how much nausea they represent, based on our expectations."

More information

The Alternative Medicine Foundation has more about alternative medical treatments.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: University of Rochester Medical Center, news release, April 8, 2009

Last Updated: April 13, 2009

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