ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture Eases Breast Cancer Treatment Side Effects
Needling Away Your Headaches With Acupuncture
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age
Osteoporosis May Raise Risk for Vertigo
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
CANCER
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
CAREGIVING
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
MRSA Infections Spreading to Kids in Community
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
DIABETES
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
DIET, NUTRITION
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
Go Healthy, Not Hungry for Holiday Eating
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications
Improved Fungicides May Be Easier on Environment
EYE CARE, VISION
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
FITNESS
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Hand-Washing Habits Still Need Improvement: Survey Says
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Small Cuts in Salt Intake Spur Big Drops in Heart Trouble
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
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Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation

MONDAY, April 13 (HealthDay News) -- Acupressure wristbands might help cancer patients experience almost a 25 percent less nausea during radiation treatments, a new study says.

The finding, published in the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, also discounted the common belief that such non-Western medical treatments act more as a placebo than an actual pain reliever.

"We know the placebo effect exists; the problem is that we don't know how to measure it very well," corresponding author Joseph A. Roscoe, a research associate professor at the James P. Wilmot Cancer Center at the University of Rochester Medical Center, said in a university news release. "In this study, we attempted to manipulate the information we gave to patients to see if their expectations about nausea could be changed. As it turned out, our information to change people's expectations had no effect, but we still found that the wristbands reduce nausea symptoms."

The wristbands put pressure on a "nausea point" identified by traditional Chinese acupuncture. The pressure acts to change the flow of universal chi energy, according to the Eastern belief.

The study involved 88 people who experienced nausea after radiation treatments for cancer. Some were given wristbands to wear, and the others were not. And about half of those in the wristband group were also given information that explicitly said the wristbands cut down on nausea, whereas handouts given to the others with wristbands contained more neutral information.

Those with wristbands experienced a 24 percent decrease in nausea, regardless of which set of information they were given before the experiment. The group without wristbands reported just a 5 percent lessening of nausea.

"Some of our body's feelings and sensations are ambiguous and subject to interpretation," Roscoe said. "Your mind cannot make a blister go away or reduce hair loss, but it can interpret ambiguous abdominal sensations and decide how much nausea they represent, based on our expectations."

More information

The Alternative Medicine Foundation has more about alternative medical treatments.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: University of Rochester Medical Center, news release, April 8, 2009

Last Updated: April 13, 2009

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