ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Human Ancestors Put Best Foot Forward 1.5M Years Ago
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
CANCER
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
Vitamin D May Lower Colon Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
For Dialysis Patients, More Pills = Lower Quality of Life
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
DIABETES
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
Quick Weight Loss May Be Best for Long-Term Success
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
'Soda Tax' Wins Health Experts' Support
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Improved Fungicides May Be Easier on Environment
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
EPA Alerts Seniors to Carbon Monoxide Dangers
EYE CARE, VISION
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
Almost Two-Thirds of Americans Meet Exercise Guidelines
Go To Work But Skip The Car
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
When Clocks Change, Body May Need Time to Adjust
Autumn Chores Often Hazardous
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
SENIORS
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
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Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation

MONDAY, April 13 (HealthDay News) -- Acupressure wristbands might help cancer patients experience almost a 25 percent less nausea during radiation treatments, a new study says.

The finding, published in the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, also discounted the common belief that such non-Western medical treatments act more as a placebo than an actual pain reliever.

"We know the placebo effect exists; the problem is that we don't know how to measure it very well," corresponding author Joseph A. Roscoe, a research associate professor at the James P. Wilmot Cancer Center at the University of Rochester Medical Center, said in a university news release. "In this study, we attempted to manipulate the information we gave to patients to see if their expectations about nausea could be changed. As it turned out, our information to change people's expectations had no effect, but we still found that the wristbands reduce nausea symptoms."

The wristbands put pressure on a "nausea point" identified by traditional Chinese acupuncture. The pressure acts to change the flow of universal chi energy, according to the Eastern belief.

The study involved 88 people who experienced nausea after radiation treatments for cancer. Some were given wristbands to wear, and the others were not. And about half of those in the wristband group were also given information that explicitly said the wristbands cut down on nausea, whereas handouts given to the others with wristbands contained more neutral information.

Those with wristbands experienced a 24 percent decrease in nausea, regardless of which set of information they were given before the experiment. The group without wristbands reported just a 5 percent lessening of nausea.

"Some of our body's feelings and sensations are ambiguous and subject to interpretation," Roscoe said. "Your mind cannot make a blister go away or reduce hair loss, but it can interpret ambiguous abdominal sensations and decide how much nausea they represent, based on our expectations."

More information

The Alternative Medicine Foundation has more about alternative medical treatments.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: University of Rochester Medical Center, news release, April 8, 2009

Last Updated: April 13, 2009

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