ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Many Americans Fall Short on Their Vitamin D
Genes May Help Drive Rotator Cuff Injury
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
CANCER
Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
Gene Screen May Predict Colon Cancer's Return
CAREGIVING
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
MRSA Infections Spreading to Kids in Community
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
DIABETES
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
Coffee Drinkers Might Live Longer
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Smog Standards Need Tightening, Activists Say
Meat-Eating Dinosaurs Used Legs and Arms Like Birds
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
EYE CARE, VISION
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
FITNESS
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Vitamin D and Bone Health: Are You Getting Enough of This Important Vitamin?
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
Health Gains From Lowered Smoking Rates in Jeopardy
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
Scary Toxins Make Halloween Face Paints Questionable
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
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Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation

MONDAY, April 13 (HealthDay News) -- Acupressure wristbands might help cancer patients experience almost a 25 percent less nausea during radiation treatments, a new study says.

The finding, published in the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, also discounted the common belief that such non-Western medical treatments act more as a placebo than an actual pain reliever.

"We know the placebo effect exists; the problem is that we don't know how to measure it very well," corresponding author Joseph A. Roscoe, a research associate professor at the James P. Wilmot Cancer Center at the University of Rochester Medical Center, said in a university news release. "In this study, we attempted to manipulate the information we gave to patients to see if their expectations about nausea could be changed. As it turned out, our information to change people's expectations had no effect, but we still found that the wristbands reduce nausea symptoms."

The wristbands put pressure on a "nausea point" identified by traditional Chinese acupuncture. The pressure acts to change the flow of universal chi energy, according to the Eastern belief.

The study involved 88 people who experienced nausea after radiation treatments for cancer. Some were given wristbands to wear, and the others were not. And about half of those in the wristband group were also given information that explicitly said the wristbands cut down on nausea, whereas handouts given to the others with wristbands contained more neutral information.

Those with wristbands experienced a 24 percent decrease in nausea, regardless of which set of information they were given before the experiment. The group without wristbands reported just a 5 percent lessening of nausea.

"Some of our body's feelings and sensations are ambiguous and subject to interpretation," Roscoe said. "Your mind cannot make a blister go away or reduce hair loss, but it can interpret ambiguous abdominal sensations and decide how much nausea they represent, based on our expectations."

More information

The Alternative Medicine Foundation has more about alternative medical treatments.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: University of Rochester Medical Center, news release, April 8, 2009

Last Updated: April 13, 2009

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