ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Human Ancestors Put Best Foot Forward 1.5M Years Ago
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
CANCER
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Minorities Distrust Medical System More
CAREGIVING
Reduce Suffering, Urge Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Holistic Dentistry-My View
DIABETES
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
DIET, NUTRITION
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
Fruits, Vegetables, Teas May Cut Smokers' Cancer Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
Old-Growth Forests Dying Off in U.S. West
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
EYE CARE, VISION
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
FITNESS
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Autumn Chores Often Hazardous
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
The Unmedicated Mind
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
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Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks

FRIDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- Highlighting the negative impact tobacco use has on cardiovascular health, researchers say that heavy smokers were 2.5 times more likely to die than their non-smoking peers during a 30-year study in Norway.

The newly available research found that nonsmokers lived longer and experienced fewer incidents of heart attack and cardiovascular disease than smokers, especially when compared with heavy smokers (those who lit up at least 20 cigarettes a day).

Smokers were also at greater risk of developing diabetes and strokes than nonsmokers, according to the study findings, presented last week at the EuroPRevent 2009 conference in Stockholm, Sweden.

"What these results show is the cumulative long-term association between smoking and death and cardiovascular risk," investigator Haakon Meyer, a professor at the University of Oslo and Norwegian Institute of Public Health, said in a news release issued by the European Society of Cardiology. "Around two-thirds of the middle-aged heavy-smoking men and half the heavy-smoking women had died or had a cardiovascular disease within the next 30 years. The incidence was much lower in never-smokers and reflects the tremendously adverse effect of smoking on health and longevity. The difference in outcome between the never-smokers and heavy smokers was substantial."

The study began in 1974 with 54,075 middle-aged Norwegian men and women agreeing to take part in a basic cardiovascular examination. By matching the participants to population records over the next three decades, the researchers recorded 13,103 deaths, then followed-up on the living participants with a questionnaire during the mid-2000s.

The team found that 45 percent of males considered to be heavy smokers had died during the study period compared with 18 percent of the men who never smoked; among the women, 33 percent of heavy smokers died while 13 percent of the non-smoking women did.

"These results show what a tremendous impact smoking has on mortality," Meyer said. "We are talking about very high numbers of people."

The questionnaire responses revealed that 21 percent of the heavy-smoking men had experienced a heart attack compared with 10 percent of their non-smoking peers. For women, the rate was similar: 11 percent among the heavy-smoking female survivors and 4 percent among those who never smoked.

"This study underlines the public health messages about smoking. We have seen declines in the prevalence of smoking in developed countries, but challenges still remain. Certain population groups -- young women, immigrant communities -- still have high rates of smoking, and there's more to be done here."

More information

The American Heart Association has more about how smoking increases the risk of cardiovascular disease.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: European Society of Cardiology, news release, May 8, 2009

Last Updated: May 15, 2009

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