ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Human Ancestors Put Best Foot Forward 1.5M Years Ago
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
CANCER
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Breast Self-Exam Rates Go Up With Counseling
CAREGIVING
Omega-3 Fatty Acid May Help 'Preemie' Girls' Brains
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
DIABETES
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
Myrrh May Lower High Cholesterol
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment
EYE CARE, VISION
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
FITNESS
Exercise Guards White Blood Cells Against Aging
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
Can a Bad Boss Make You Sick?
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
Pool Chemicals Raise Kids Allergy, Asthma Risk
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Add your Article

Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment

THURSDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Yoga can improve the emotional health of breast cancer patients, contends a new U.S. study.

"Given the high levels of stress and distress that many women with breast cancer experience, the opportunity to experience feeling more peaceful and calm in the midst of breast cancer is a significant benefit," lead researcher Suzanne Danhauer, of the Wake Forest University School of Medicine, said in a university news release.

The study involved 44 women with breast cancer. About a third of them were undergoing cancer treatment during the study, and the others had completed their treatment. Half were enrolled in a yoga program, and half were put on a waiting list for the program.

Women in the yoga group participated in 75-minute classes in restorative yoga -- a more passive and gentle form of yoga that uses props such as cushions and blankets for support. At the beginning and end of the study, both groups of women completed questionnaires evaluating their quality of life.

After 10 weeks of classes, the yoga participants showed greater improvements in areas of mental health such as depression, positive emotions and spirituality -- feeling calm and peaceful -- than did the women still waiting to begin the yoga program. The yoga group reported, on average, a 50 percent reduction in feelings of depression and a 12 percent increase in feelings of peace and meaning. Yoga participants also reported less fatigue than the others, the study found.

The results, which Danhauer said "are very promising and will allow us to embark on a much larger scale study," were published Feb. 24 in a special physical activity issue of the journal Psycho-Oncology.

"Evidence from systematic reviews of randomized trials is quite strong that mind-body therapies improve mood, quality of life and treatment-related symptoms in people with cancer," Danhauer said. "Yoga is one mind-body therapy that is widely available and involves relatively reasonable costs."

More information

The American Cancer Society offers tips on coping with breast cancer.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Wiley-Blackwell, news release, Feb. 24, 2009

Last Updated: Feb. 26, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

Licensed by www.eholistic.com