ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
A Winning Strategy to Beat Spring Sporting Injuries
Many Americans Fall Short on Their Vitamin D
Low Vitamin D Raises Women's Hip Fracture Risk
CANCER
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Get to Know the Pap Test
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
Recession Scrambling Health Spending in U.S.
New Guidelines for Treating Heart Failure
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
DIABETES
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
DIET, NUTRITION
The High-Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) Debate
For Fitness, Cutting Calories May Not Be Enough
Quick Weight Loss May Be Best for Long-Term Success
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Sunken, Unexploded Bombs Pose Cancer Risk
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
EYE CARE, VISION
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
FITNESS
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Why Am I So Tired? Could It Be Low Thyroid?
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Scary Toxins Make Halloween Face Paints Questionable
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
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Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women

Yoga is safe for pregnant women, as long as they approach the activity with reasonable caution and moderation, experts say.

"Women who are expecting can benefit greatly from exercise, especially yoga -- they just need to be aware of their limitations," orthopaedic surgeon and mom-to-be Dr. Rachel Rohde said in a news release issued by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS).

"A pregnant woman's body goes through a lot of changes that will alter the way she practices yoga, whether she is a veteran or a beginner," Rohde added.

As a fitness alternative, yoga allows pregnant women to maintain an exercise program without harming their baby or their heart, according to the AAOS and, overall, the benefits of such a low-impact regimen outweigh the risks.

However, maintaining correct yoga positioning is critical to ensuring general safety and avoiding muscle or joint injury, the organization pointed out. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission noted that more than 5,500 Americans were treated for yoga-related injuries in 2008.

Nevertheless, the AAOS says that if performed properly, yoga affords expectant mothers a good opportunity to build strength and flexibility, while achieving a measure of relaxation and breath control.

"One of the best aspects of yoga is being in control of your body and having the ability to do each movement at your own pace," said Rodhe. "Poses like 'downward dog' that require a lot of pressure on the palm can increase carpal tunnel symptoms by pressing on a major nerve; if you get numbness in your fingers while in one of these positions, move so that the weight is not resting on your hands. If you are unable to move into a difficult position, you always have the option to get into a resting pose if experiencing pain."

The AAOS recommends that those interested in practicing yoga should consult their physician first and make sure they work with a qualified instructor. Proper warm-ups and attire are important as well, and pregnant women should take care to remain properly hydrated and avoid forms of yoga such as Birkam -- also called "hot" yoga -- that can unduly raise their body temperature.

SOURCES: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, news release, May 17, 2010 Published on: May 23, 2010